Friday, 12 April 2013

Moroccan Blues


       
Moroccan Blues

 Mesmerised from
the land of small islands
                      I greet you
         you reply in french
           I don't understand

                    swollen feet
do your streets no justice
     I drag on your spread
   like the snake charmer
               on his tobacco

            your spice sings
         mint and cinnamon
      embrace my tongue
bringing me back to life
      like your horse trot
              at the Medina



never mind the
french rites of passage
     greeting my palate
for the sake of a snake
charmer whose smile
makes money with guile
au revoir chilling   
your hustle and sting
hug of orange trees

I'm leaving


©Adura Ojo - Day 12 - NaPoWriMo 2013

Been in Marrakech, Morocco for a week. Quite an experience. I've got a thing for North Africa and the Mediterranean that I can't get out of my system! Heading back home. 

23 comments :

  1. This sounds a little bit frightening and very enticing and exotic! The pictures are great too. I particularly like the lines:

    My swollen feet
    do your streets no justice
    ...
    with mint and cinnamon
    you embrace my tongue


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  2. ah i have a bit of wanderlust and poems like this bring it out...and bid me travel til my feet are swollen as well...smiles...love the use of the senses in this...

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  3. ha. i remembered this one at the first line...still a trip i would love to take...enjoying my trip around the world in peoples poems tonight...hope you are well adura

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    1. I'm fine, Brian. Thank you:) Morocco is a beautiful country. We do plan to go back at some point...soon. I'll recommend a trip there anytime.

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  4. Facinating write. Great pictures too!

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  5. This is like a palette knife painting: dabs of colour in thick impasto paint to build up a wonderful whole.

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    1. Thanks, Aprille. 'Glad and feel honoured the poem 'speaks' to you in this way.

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  6. Wow, I think I would like to see Morocco after reading your poem.. It sounds exotic to me. Your words make Morocco LIVE.

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    1. Ha Mary, that's high praise indeed. Thank you so much. Morocco is fascinating. To see those snake charmers work their magic with live cobras - that alone was worth every penny we paid to get there - among many other treats.

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  7. This is lovely. The images are very strong, I can almost smell the spices. Plus the "french I can't understand" and the swollen feet made me smile.

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    1. Thanks, Heidi. My feet were so swollen I wondered how I could still walk! But I did...a lot! I couldn't resist despite the discomfort. Our lack of french was a problem but we got by. We were lucky to have an English speaking guide take us through the secret alleyways of Marrakech - a great way to end our holiday on our last day out there.

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  8. Ah - lovely close especially - the mixed good and bad--very flavorful. k.

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    1. Glad you got that mix of the good and the bad. Marrakech and I did have a love-hate relationship at first but I fell head over heels in love from about the third day:)

      And we were both sad to say goodbye.

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  9. I haven't been to Morocco but the images of snake charmer and scents of spice and cinnamon are what stood out for me ~ Good to see you Adura ~

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  10. I haven't been to Morocco but the images of snake charmer and scents of spice and cinnamon are what stood out for me ~ Good to see you Adura ~

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    1. Good to see you too, Grace. The hustle can be hard going at times - with the snake charmers wanting to be paid every time you take a picture. One has to watch out for pickpockets too, lol.

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  11. A great example of how we are so excited and raring to go at the start of a vacation... exhausted and ready to go home at the end.

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  12. oh nice..love the hug of orange trees...the embracing the tongue with mint and cinnamon...ah sounds like a charming place for sure..

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  13. The snippets of images melt together like pieces were I can feel Marakesh inside. Especially the mixing in of French words

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  14. What a treat for all the senses this poem is; I've not been to Africa, but India delivers a similar assault on the senses to the one you've descrbed here.

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